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Across Australia, developers and construction teams are recognising that hoardings are valuable pieces of real estate that can tell a story, connect the community to a development site and showcase construction from the foundations up.

 

At KJA we work with construction teams and developers to consider hoardings as a key project communication tool.

 

Step 1: What’s the story? Tell people what you are building – colour it, activate it, shape it – communicate it. And if there is some history attached to the site, share it. Just make sure information is concise, accurate and attention-grabbing. Drive people to find out more detailed information about the site via a catchy web address.

 

Step 2: Build community interest. Use visuals and infographics to share some facts about how much soil and rock will be excavated, how much steel will form the structure and how the development will transform the local area with green spaces, more housing, office space or retail options. Think about how you can tailor the information to also appeal to children.

 

Step 3: Frame your development. People are curious and large scale construction projects are fascinating, particularly for the general community. Hoardings are an opportunity to draw people into the site through viewing platforms and windows where they can see what’s happening and track the progress of the development as it evolves through various stages.

 

Step 4: Show the way. Construction impacts often extend beyond the hoarding to pedestrian and traffic areas. Hoardings are the ideal place to provide wayfinding information to direct people to new routes during construction. This helps to mitigate any issues or confusion with walkways and transit routes resulting from the construction and development phase.

 

Step 5: Unleash your creativity. Hoardings are a 24/7 billboard for the life of your construction project. Be creative with the presentation and use design and communications to relay messages. Celebrating the local history or engaging a local school to provide artwork for hoardings are meaningful ways to creatively embed a development in your local area.

 

Importantly, many local councils and government projects will have clear parameters of what is acceptable for hoarding information. Working with your approval authority from the start of a project to discuss your ideas will always provide the basis for a positive outcome.

 

If you need advice on how to make the most of your hoarding don’t hesitate to call Natalie Boyd, KJA Practice Directoron 02 9955 5040.

 

Below are some examples of international hoardings which we found both inspirational and aspirational.

Multi-disciplinary design firm Klein-Dytham implemented a 274 metre long 'Green Green Screen' in Tokyo's Omotesando while construction was carried out behind over a period of three years

Multi-disciplinary design firm Klein-Dytham implemented a 274 metre long 'Green Green Screen' in Tokyo's Omotesando while construction was carried out behind over a period of three years

Construction hoarding in King’s Cross UK, showing a viewing window into the site. Design by Lucinda Rogers

Construction hoarding in King’s Cross UK, showing a viewing window into the site. Design by Lucinda Rogers

Broadgate, UK: a clever series of graffiti-proof hoardings by Williams Murray Hamm

Broadgate, UK: a clever series of graffiti-proof hoardings by Williams Murray Hamm